The Posillipo promontory is an elongated tufaceous ridge located on the southern periphery of the Campi Flegrei active volcanic complex that hosts several underwater archaeological structures dated mostly in the 1st century BC and the Imperial age. The so-called Palazzo degli Spiriti, built in the 1st century BC along the coast of the Posillipo hill (Naples, Italy), is one of the most preserved Roman maritime villas on the Gulf of Naples, with clear evidence of the interaction of both human and natural events. At this site, a relative sea level rise due to a sudden subsidence occurred between the 1st century BC and 1st century AD, probably of volcano-tectonic origin, produced a significant amount of adaptation, as the partial closure of the ground floor windows of the villa still visible. Integrated surveys by means of a marine drone and several direct archaeological measurements were carried out both on the coastline and in the underwater portion of this site.A GIS analysis of geophysical, LIDAR, multibeam and archaeological data has returned a 3D reconstruction of the Roman landscape, useful to understand both the natural events occurred in the area since the Roman Period (vertical ground movements, wave erosion, etc.) and the correlative steps of human occupation and adaptation.

Coastal landscape evolution of Naples (Southern Italy) since the Roman period from archaeological and geomorphological data at Palazzo degli Spiriti site

Aucelli, P.;Mattei, G.;Pappone, G.;
2018

Abstract

The Posillipo promontory is an elongated tufaceous ridge located on the southern periphery of the Campi Flegrei active volcanic complex that hosts several underwater archaeological structures dated mostly in the 1st century BC and the Imperial age. The so-called Palazzo degli Spiriti, built in the 1st century BC along the coast of the Posillipo hill (Naples, Italy), is one of the most preserved Roman maritime villas on the Gulf of Naples, with clear evidence of the interaction of both human and natural events. At this site, a relative sea level rise due to a sudden subsidence occurred between the 1st century BC and 1st century AD, probably of volcano-tectonic origin, produced a significant amount of adaptation, as the partial closure of the ground floor windows of the villa still visible. Integrated surveys by means of a marine drone and several direct archaeological measurements were carried out both on the coastline and in the underwater portion of this site.A GIS analysis of geophysical, LIDAR, multibeam and archaeological data has returned a 3D reconstruction of the Roman landscape, useful to understand both the natural events occurred in the area since the Roman Period (vertical ground movements, wave erosion, etc.) and the correlative steps of human occupation and adaptation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11367/65789
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