Cyanobacterial blooms (CBs) are generally triggered by eutrophic conditions due to anthropogenic nutrient inputs to local waters (wastewater or contaminated waters). During the bloom, some species produce toxic secondary metabolites (cyanotoxins) that are dangerous for humans and animals. Here, a multidisciplinary strategy for an early detection and constant monitoring is proposed. This strategy combines remote/proximal sensing technology with analytical/biotechnological analyses. To demonstrate the applicability of this strategy, four anthropogenically-impacted sites were selected along the Campania coast of southwestern Italy, in the so called 'Land of Fires'. The sites were observed using satellite and aircraft images during summer, 2015. Algal community composition was determined using spectrophotometric analysis for the detection of the cyanobacterial pigment phycocyanin (PC). Complementary metagenomic analysis revealed the taxonomic presence of cyanobacteria belonging to genera associated with strong eutrophic conditions. Key elements of this strategy are the combination and integration of applying different methodological approaches such as the parallel and combined use of satellite, aerial and in-situ data, the simplified multispectral image indexing and classification for a truly efficient method in detecting early blooms of cyanobacteria. The effectiveness of the strategy has been validated also by the specific taxa of cyanobacteria found in the examined areas that confirm the assumption that cyanobacterial blooms may serve as useful bioindicators of degraded water quality in coastal ecosystems. To our knowledge this is the first time that the presence of cyanobacteria has been observed in water bodies along the Campania coast.

Cyanobacteria as indicators of water quality in Campania coasts, Italy: A monitoring strategy combining remote/proximal sensing and in situ data

ROMANO, Vincenza;LEGA, MASSIMILIANO
2017-01-01

Abstract

Cyanobacterial blooms (CBs) are generally triggered by eutrophic conditions due to anthropogenic nutrient inputs to local waters (wastewater or contaminated waters). During the bloom, some species produce toxic secondary metabolites (cyanotoxins) that are dangerous for humans and animals. Here, a multidisciplinary strategy for an early detection and constant monitoring is proposed. This strategy combines remote/proximal sensing technology with analytical/biotechnological analyses. To demonstrate the applicability of this strategy, four anthropogenically-impacted sites were selected along the Campania coast of southwestern Italy, in the so called 'Land of Fires'. The sites were observed using satellite and aircraft images during summer, 2015. Algal community composition was determined using spectrophotometric analysis for the detection of the cyanobacterial pigment phycocyanin (PC). Complementary metagenomic analysis revealed the taxonomic presence of cyanobacteria belonging to genera associated with strong eutrophic conditions. Key elements of this strategy are the combination and integration of applying different methodological approaches such as the parallel and combined use of satellite, aerial and in-situ data, the simplified multispectral image indexing and classification for a truly efficient method in detecting early blooms of cyanobacteria. The effectiveness of the strategy has been validated also by the specific taxa of cyanobacteria found in the examined areas that confirm the assumption that cyanobacterial blooms may serve as useful bioindicators of degraded water quality in coastal ecosystems. To our knowledge this is the first time that the presence of cyanobacteria has been observed in water bodies along the Campania coast.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11367/58115
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