We tested the hypothesis of a relationship between heart rate variability (HRV) and Rolandic mu rhythms in relaxed condition of resting state. Resting state eyes-closed electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrocardiographic (ECG) data were recorded (10-20 System) in 42 healthy adults. EEG rhythms of interest were high-frequency alpha (10.5-13Hz) and low-frequency beta (13-20Hz), which are supposed to form Rolandic mu rhythms. Rolandic and occipital (control) EEG sources were estimated by LORETA software. Results showed a statistically significant (p<0.05, corrected) negative correlation across all subjects between Rolandic cortical sources of low-frequency beta rhythms and the low-frequency band power (LF, 0.04-0.15Hz) of tachogram spectrum as an index of HRV. The lower the amplitude of Rolandic sources of low-frequency beta rhythms (as a putative sign of activity of somatomotor cortex), the higher the LF band power of tachogram spectrum (as a putative sign of sympathetic activity). This effect was specific as there was neither a similar correlation between these EEG rhythms and high-frequency band power of tachogram spectrum (as a putative sign of parasympathetic vagal activity) neither between occipital sources of low-frequency beta rhythms (as a putative sign of activity of visual cortex) and LF band power of tachogram spectrum. These results suggest that Rolandic low-frequency beta rhythms are related to sympathetic activity regulating heart rate, as a dynamic neurophysiologic oscillatory mechanism sub-serving the interaction between brain neural populations involved in somatomotor control and brain neural populations regulating ANS signals to heart for on-going homeostatic adaptations.

Resting state Rolandic mu rhythms are related to activity of sympathetic component of autonomic nervous system in healthy humans

SORICELLI, ANDREA;
2015

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis of a relationship between heart rate variability (HRV) and Rolandic mu rhythms in relaxed condition of resting state. Resting state eyes-closed electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrocardiographic (ECG) data were recorded (10-20 System) in 42 healthy adults. EEG rhythms of interest were high-frequency alpha (10.5-13Hz) and low-frequency beta (13-20Hz), which are supposed to form Rolandic mu rhythms. Rolandic and occipital (control) EEG sources were estimated by LORETA software. Results showed a statistically significant (p<0.05, corrected) negative correlation across all subjects between Rolandic cortical sources of low-frequency beta rhythms and the low-frequency band power (LF, 0.04-0.15Hz) of tachogram spectrum as an index of HRV. The lower the amplitude of Rolandic sources of low-frequency beta rhythms (as a putative sign of activity of somatomotor cortex), the higher the LF band power of tachogram spectrum (as a putative sign of sympathetic activity). This effect was specific as there was neither a similar correlation between these EEG rhythms and high-frequency band power of tachogram spectrum (as a putative sign of parasympathetic vagal activity) neither between occipital sources of low-frequency beta rhythms (as a putative sign of activity of visual cortex) and LF band power of tachogram spectrum. These results suggest that Rolandic low-frequency beta rhythms are related to sympathetic activity regulating heart rate, as a dynamic neurophysiologic oscillatory mechanism sub-serving the interaction between brain neural populations involved in somatomotor control and brain neural populations regulating ANS signals to heart for on-going homeostatic adaptations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11367/38298
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