Background: Current research demonstrates that health information technology can improve the efciency and quality of health services. However, many implementation projects have failed due to behavioural problems associated with technology usages, such as underuse, resistance, sabotage, and even rejection by potential users. Therefore, user acceptance was one of the main factors contributing to the success of health information technology implementation. However, research suggests that behavioural models do not universally hold across cultures. The present article considers national cultural values (power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism, masculinity/femininity, and time orientation) as individual diference variables that afect user behaviour and incorporates them into the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as moderators of technology acceptance relationships. Therefore, this research analyses which national cultural values afect technology acceptance behaviour in hospitals. Methods: The authors develop and test seven hypotheses regarding this relationship using the partial least squares (PLS) technique, a structural equation modelling method. The authors collected data from 160 questionnaires completed by clinicians and non-clinicians working in one hospital. Results: The fndings show that uncertainty avoidance, masculinity/femininity, and time orientation are the national cultural values that afect technology acceptance in hospitals. In particular, individuals with masculine cultural values, higher uncertainty avoidance, and a long-term orientation infuence behavioural intention to use technology. Conclusion: The bureaucratic model still decisively characterises the Italian health sector and consequently afects the choices of frms and workers, including the choice of technology adoption. Cultural values of masculinity, risk aversion, and long-term orientation afect intention to use through social norms rather than through perceived utility.

Explaing users’ technology acceptance through national cultural values in the hospital context

Metallo C.
;
Agrifoglio R.;Lepore L.;Landriani L
2022

Abstract

Background: Current research demonstrates that health information technology can improve the efciency and quality of health services. However, many implementation projects have failed due to behavioural problems associated with technology usages, such as underuse, resistance, sabotage, and even rejection by potential users. Therefore, user acceptance was one of the main factors contributing to the success of health information technology implementation. However, research suggests that behavioural models do not universally hold across cultures. The present article considers national cultural values (power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism, masculinity/femininity, and time orientation) as individual diference variables that afect user behaviour and incorporates them into the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as moderators of technology acceptance relationships. Therefore, this research analyses which national cultural values afect technology acceptance behaviour in hospitals. Methods: The authors develop and test seven hypotheses regarding this relationship using the partial least squares (PLS) technique, a structural equation modelling method. The authors collected data from 160 questionnaires completed by clinicians and non-clinicians working in one hospital. Results: The fndings show that uncertainty avoidance, masculinity/femininity, and time orientation are the national cultural values that afect technology acceptance in hospitals. In particular, individuals with masculine cultural values, higher uncertainty avoidance, and a long-term orientation infuence behavioural intention to use technology. Conclusion: The bureaucratic model still decisively characterises the Italian health sector and consequently afects the choices of frms and workers, including the choice of technology adoption. Cultural values of masculinity, risk aversion, and long-term orientation afect intention to use through social norms rather than through perceived utility.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11367/100536
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